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4 Things You Can Do to Make Flossing Easier

4ThingsYouCanDotoMakeFlossingEasier

Nothing is more devilishly delicious than hearing someone dish on some celebrity gossip—especially if the "disher" is intimately involved with the "dishee." Consider this juicy morsel: Singer Katy Perry revealed on the British radio show Heart Breakfast that her fiancé, popular actor Orlando Bloom—hope you're sitting down—leaves used dental floss "everywhere."

Although Perry is thrilled with her beau's commitment to oral hygiene ("He has brilliant teeth"), she's not as equally thrilled with floss left "beside the bed, in the car and on the kitchen table."

Horrors.

Okay, maybe not. Although this might absolutely gross some people out, it's pretty ho-hum as salacious celebrity dirt goes. What's keen to note, though, is that at least Mr. Bloom flosses—putting him in a distinct minority of adults (about one-third) who actually floss regularly. That's far fewer than those who brush, a task that takes about the same amount of time.

So, why are so many "meh" about flossing? Simply put, many people find traditional flossing to be cumbersome and messy. And when they're done, they're left holding a wet, slippery piece of floss covered in "eww."

It doesn't have to be that way. Here are 4 tips to help make flossing easier and more pleasant.

Improve your technique. We're not born to floss—it's a learned skill, which, like others, we can improve over time. In that regard, your dentist provider can serve as your "personal trainer," giving you valuable tips in how to work with floss. And if you truly want to get to "floss town," practice, practice, practice every day.

Floss after you brush. Dental professionals actually debate over which is best to do first, brushing or flossing. One of the advantages for the former first is that brushing can get the majority of plaque out of the way, so there's less to deal with during flossing. If you tend to draw out a lot of sticky plaque while flossing, try brushing first.

Use floss picks. If the thread-around-the-fingers method isn't your cup of tea, try floss picks. These are disposable plastic handles with a sharp pick on one end and what resembles a bow at the other, with a tiny piece of floss strung between the bow. Some people find this device much easier to maneuver between teeth than plain floss.

Switch to a water flosser. A water flosser is another option that might be even easier than a floss pick. It consists of a small motorized pump that supplies a pressurized water spray through a handheld wand, which you use to direct the spray between your teeth. Studies have shown it to be as effective as floss thread, especially for braces wearers or people with limited hand dexterity.

If you would like more information about best oral hygiene practices, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flossing.”

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